Hex to Decimal Bytes Array Converter

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This is a free hex converter that converts hex values into bytes array.

Hexadecimal

The hexadecimal numeral system, often shortened to "hex", is a numeral system made up of 16 symbols (base 16). The standard numeral system is called decimal (base 10) and uses ten symbols: 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. Hexadecimal uses the decimal numbers and six extra symbols. There are no numerical symbols that represent values greater than ten, so letters taken from the English alphabet are used, specifically A, B, C, D, E and F. Hexadecimal A = decimal 10, and hexadecimal F = decimal 15. Humans mostly use the decimal system. This is probably because humans have ten fingers in their hands. Computers however, only have on and off, called a binary digit (or bit, for short). A binary number is just a string of zeros and ones: 11011011, for example. For convenience, engineers working with computers tend to group bits together. In earlier days, such as the 1960's, they would group 3 bits at a time (much like large decimal numbers are grouped in threes, like the number 123,456,789). Three bits, each being on or off, can represent the eight numbers from 0 to 7: 000 = 0; 001 = 1; 010 = 2; 011 = 3; 100 = 4; 101 = 5; 110 = 6 and 111 = 7. This is called octal.

As computers got bigger, it was more convenient to group bits by four instead of three. This doubles the numbers that the symbol would represent; it can have 16 values instead of eight. Hex = 6 and Decimal = 10, so it is called hexadecimal. Four bits is called a nibble (sometimes spelled nybble). A nibble is one hexadecimal digit, and is written using a symbol 0-9 or A-F. Two nibbles is a byte (8 bits). Most computer operations use the byte, or a multiple of the byte (16 bits, 24, 32, 64, etc.). Hexadecimal makes it easier to write these large binary numbers. To avoid confusion with decimal, octal or other numbering systems, hexadecimal numbers are sometimes written with a "h" after the number. For example, 63h means 63 hexadecimal. Software developers quite often use 0x before the number (0x63)

Byte

The byte is a unit of digital information that most commonly consists of eight bits, representing a binary number. Historically, the byte was the number of bits used to encode a single character of text in a computer and for this reason it is the smallest addressable unit of memory in many computer architectures. The size of the byte has historically been hardware dependent and no definitive standards existed that mandated the size – byte-sizes from 1 to 48 bits are known to have been used in the past. Early character encoding systems often used six bits, and machines using six-bit and nine-bit bytes were common into the 1960s. These machines most commonly had memory words of 12, 24, 36, 48 or 60 bits, corresponding to two, four, six, eight or 10 six-bit bytes. In this era, bytes in the instruction stream were often referred to as syllables, before the term byte became common. The modern de facto standard of eight bits, as documented in ISO/IEC 2382-1:1993, is a convenient power of two permitting the values 0 through 255 for one byte (2 to the power 8 is 256, where zero signifies a number as well). The international standard IEC 80000-13 codified this common meaning. Many types of applications use information representable in eight or fewer bits and processor designers optimize for this common usage. The popularity of major commercial computing architectures has aided in the ubiquitous acceptance of the eight-bit size. Modern architectures typically use 32- or 64-bit words, built of four or eight bytes. The unit symbol for the byte was designated as the upper-case letter B by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in contrast to the bit, whose IEEE symbol is a lower-case b. Internationally, the unit octet, symbol o, explicitly denotes a sequence of eight bits, eliminating the ambiguity of the byte.